Don’t Let the Spark Go Out on Your Fireworks Fun

The use of fireworks to celebrate America’s Independence are almost as old as the Declaration of Independence itself. According to an American University (Washington, D best slimming products.C.) researcher, the Continental Congress authorized a display in Philadelphia on July 4, 1777, one year after the Declaration of Independence was adopted.

In 2011, Michigan lifted the sales ban on louder and more powerful fireworks such as Roman Candles and Bottle Rockets. As more families are celebrating the greatest of American holidays with their own backyard firework displays, the risk for burns and other severe injuries is a real concern. The National Fire Protection Association, the authority on fire, building and electrical safety, reports thousands of people, most often children and teens, are injured while using consumer fireworks.

  • 57% of injuries caused by fireworks are burns
  • 39% of firework-related injuries are caused by sparklers, small firecrackers, and novelties, of which 25% required emergency care.
  • 2 out of 5 of all reported fires are caused by fireworks every year on the Fourth of July.
  • 1200 degrees: The temperature of the sparks from sparklers, fountains, and novelty fireworks. (Compared to water boiling at 212 degrees and glass melting at 900 degrees)
  • The risk of firework injury is highest for young people 15-24 and children under 10.

Before you light your first firework of the night, be sure to have the following available.

  • Adult supervision and assistance at all times for children using fireworks.
  • Keep a bucket of water close by in case of burns.
  • Keep a fire extinguisher in close reach in case of fire to grass, trees or building structures.

Be prepared to give first-aid for firework-related injuries.

  • BURNS:
    If a burn occurs, immediately immerse the burn in the bucket of cool water. This will reduce the amount of damage to the skin. If the area can’t be immersed, place clean, cool compressed on the area
  • CLOTHES ON FIRE:
    If clothes ignite on fire, STOP, DROP and ROLL to extinguish the flames as quickly as possible. Don’t run!
  • EYE INJURIES:
    The treatment differs if the eye injury is a burn, puncture wound or foreign body.  Place a cupped hand over the affected eye or use a paper cup secured with a piece of tape. Seek emergency help or call 9 -1-1.
  • SEVERED FINGER OR TOE:
    The digit should be wrapped in a clean, sterile gauge and place on – not in – ice.  To treat bleeding at the severed area, place a clean, dry bandage over the area and apply pressure. Raise the area above heart level to slow the bleeding. Seek emergency help or call 9 -1-1.

For any burn covering an area twice the size of your palm, or burns to the face, eyes, ears, hands, feet, major joints, or genitals need to be treated immediately by a medical professional. Go to the nearest urgent care, emergency room or call 9-1-1.

The physicians and staff of the ten Michigan Urgent Care centers wish you the happiest and safest of Fourth of July celebrations.

 

Be Well!

Dr. Mohammed Arsiwala

Michigan Urgent Care